A few words about content

THE written word is often overlooked in the rush to embrace website pyrotechnics, yet it is the single most valuable tool available to organisations striving to secure or enhance brand reputation and performance through their online presence.

Statistical analysis shows that 99 per cent of all web communication is done by word, yet technical and functional wizardry have been allowed to elbow their way past eloquence and traditional communication values to claim a vaulted position from where they dazzle and win the attention of suggestible corporate executives who hold company purse strings.

All sensible evidence would suggest that to permit something as fundamental as language to become an afterthought worthy of only a meagre share of available budgets is irresponsible or foolish.

Yet this dismissive treatment of words prevails in many quarters, to the dismay of those who value language and use it professionally and who, despite having been kept out of the design-stage loop as often as not, are frequently called upon to chuck some words on to a website skeleton, months after its conception and in return for a pittance – because funding has been gobbled up almost in its entirety by the technical developers.

Why web developers outnumber content developers is a mystery.

It is widely accepted that media magnate Sumner Redstone is the man who coined the phrase “content is king” (although some say Bill Gates has that accolade).

Redstone was and is convinced that content is the only thing that will increase business, make a brand popular with the public, build sales and scorch a company name into the minds of millions.

More and more businesses – from small, start-ups to corporations that are held to be the best in their sector– have altered their marketing plans over the past decade to prioritise written or spoken messages, despite each new development in the world of technology.

From the creation of the internet to the establishment of cell phones and their increased capabilities, to Google, Facebook and Twitter, companies have learned that content is the one thing they must master in order to build their client list.

But the one problem that is still being dealt with is: What constitutes valuable content? Speak to us at WordMediaCo, and we’ll show you.

©WordMediaCo Ltd. If you wish to reproduce or translate this article, you may do so, provided you add the following credit: This article was written by David Boyes. He is a media consultant and trainer who empowers businesses to use social media more strategically. For more information visit: http://www.wordmedia.co

Social media

It’s a social thing … target your audience

SOCIAL media is THE tool of the moment for business. Unfortunately, many are fearful of trying it, some are prejudiced against it and the minority muddle through with it.

The fact is that social media is an immensely powerful way of communicating in an intimate way with your target audience. Reputation can be enhanced, a public profile can be created and nurtured. For those involved in online commerce, sales can be improved.

Gone are the days when a company would purchase space in a sector-specific publication or mainstream newspaper for the insertion of an advertisement that would, generally, appear once.

Unless the message that was conveyed was particularly appealing or striking in appearance, the reaction (or lack of it) would be obvious in a very short period of time.

Social media allows companies to engage with their audience 24/7 in a way that has previously been impossible.

Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Foursquare and other networks are a potential communications goldmine, if handled correctly.

At WordMediaCo, we place the emphasis on Twitter in the social media strategies we provide for for corporate organisations.

Why? Because, despite its 140-character limit, Twitter is versatile and integrates easily with a wide range of other applications. It also has outsized media clout – much of the mainstream media now relies on Twitter for its stories and ideas, so if you can get noticed here, the payoff can be considerable.

Twitter’s key concept of the “Retweet”, which allows you to redistribute any Tweet you like to your own audience with a click of the mouse – and allows everyone else who sees it to do the same – gives it incredibly powerful virality.

Short and Tweet: much of the mainstream media relies on Twitter for news

©WordMediaCo Ltd. If you wish to reproduce or translate this article, you may do so, provided you add the following credit: This article was written by David Boyes. He is a media consultant and trainer who empowers businesses to use social media more strategically. For more information visit: http://www.wordmedia.co

Website content

Let it flow: bridge the communications gap

THE internet is in the public domain. Websites are a form of publishing. These two facts may not be not hugely concerning for individuals who enjoy the burgeoning facility to communicate with others in the digital sphere.

But many organisations who value their reputation do not realise the damage that can be inflicted on their image if the information they disseminate through a website is not prepared to the highest standards.

WordMediaCo provides superior content for new and existing websites, prepared by professionals with an innate understanding of the media and experience of mass communication.

We ensure that corporate organisations present themselves professionally, appropriately and in a way that enhances their image and reputation by giving them credibility through words that are relevant, compelling, engaging and consistent in tone and style.

We have the knowledge and experience to identify to organisations any material that could unwittingly cause them reputational damage and provide advice on information that should or should not be included – and where legal and/or regulatory pitfalls may lie. The result is an intelligent and surefooted approach to communications in the modern media field that is rooted in respected values. We can be relied on to deliver what you need, leaving you to concentrate on your business.

From scratch …

WordMediaCo can provide a full website service – design, functionality and content.

Refresh …

WordMediaCo can give corporate websites a “makeover” which will result in better communication between company and client.

PR services …

WordMediaCo provides a PR service for organisations who wish to dovetail it with their website offering.

Empty promise: incorrectly handled, your website could become the equivalent of a deserted street

©WordMediaCo Ltd. If you wish to reproduce or translate this article, you may do so, provided you add the following credit: This article was written by David Boyes. He is a media consultant and trainer who empowers businesses to use social media more strategically. For more information visit: http://www.wordmedia.co

Why use WordMediaCo

New and old: traditional values make the difference

ALL organisations have a web presence to attract business, achieve strategic goals and open and maintain lines of communication with their target audience and beyond.

However, a website is more than a just business tool – it is the public face of your organisation. It says to the world: “Look at us.”

Under such scrutiny, image and reputation need to be able to hold their own. Credibility has to shine through. Like most constructions, foundations are the key. Your Website is your foundation, driving your company’s entire communication package.

It’s the power of the word – the good, “old-fashioned word”. In fact, it’s the good, old-fashioned published word, in digital form, and its ability to enhance or damage, to reach out or shy away, to communicate or confuse must not be under-estimated.

The world’s biggest corporations know this. Look at their websites, and try to find a spelling, grammatical or syntactical error. You won’t. Mistakes, almost invariably, don’t exist. Credibility is everything. Errors in the word game destroy that. There is no room for them.

Put simply, if an organisation’s credibility is intact, they will trade better. For companies who do not sell goods or services on the net but have a web presence, the credibility issue nonetheless remains.

The last word in credibility: a website free of spelling and grammatical is invaluable

©WordMediaCo Ltd. If you wish to reproduce or translate this article, you may do so, provided you add the following credit: This article was written by David Boyes. He is a media consultant and trainer who empowers businesses to use social media more strategically. For more information visit: http://www.wordmedia.co